AZ Woman Admits to Killing Boyfriend and Planning Her Own Suicide

Since 2008, a woman from Arizona has been on trial for killing her boyfriend by shooting him in the head, stabbing him 27 times, and slashing his throat. In an interview following the charges, defendant, J.A., said that she was confident that no jury would convict her of murder. It has recently come to light that she said this because she was planning on committing suicide, which never happened.

On February 4th, J.A. admitted to killing her boyfriend, claiming that it was only in self-defense that she did so. According to ABC News, the woman stated that her boyfriend put her in a stranglehold then detailed how he would kill each member of her family. Her confession is allegedly contrary to her earlier claims that she had nothing to do with the murder. Her defense has tried to demonstrate that her boyfriend had been abusive and controlling, both in their sexual interactions and their relationship as a whole. In addition, Travis allegedly looked at pornography and other sexually explicit content quite frequently, evidenced by his computer history and files.

In the past week, the defendant's attorneys have tried to argue that her boyfriend led a double life. In one, he was a devout Mormon who was still a virgin. In the other, he had an erotic lifestyle which included sending lewd pictures to the woman and taking photos of one another. If J.A. is convicted of her crime, then she could face the death penalty since the murder was premeditated and unnaturally cruel. If you have been convicted of murder or another violent crime, then you could be facing serious penalties such as prolonged imprisonment, hefty fines, and other serious consequences. Contact a Long Island criminal defense lawyer from our firm for aggressive legal defense.

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