Will Hurricane Sandy Cause a Rise in New York Crime?

By looking back over the patterns of time, every time there is a large natural disaster, the crime rate temporarily spikes. When Mother Nature is done wreaking havoc, many people decide that it is the perfect time to get away with murder and other crimes. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina back in 2005, the New York Times reported that,

"Beyond doubt, the sense of menace had been ignited by genuine disorder and violence. Looting varied from basic thievery to foraging for the necessities of life. Police officers said that at least one person fired for nights on end at a police station on the edge of the French Quarter. The manager of a hotel on Bourbon Street said he saw people running through the streets with guns."

Hurricane Irene had the same impact and was no exception to this rule.

Hurricane Sandy was labeled as a Category 1 storm, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration believes it one of the most powerful and devastating hurricanes to hit the United States. The massive destruction has caused chaotic aftermath as New York slowly rebuilds and repairs the damages left behind. With their underground subway system and lower building structures flooded and probable extensive power outages, who is to say how much crime could spark during this time. If the New York subway system is submerged, it will make transportation throughout the city very difficult and a new wave of crime could arise, just as it did with Hurricane Katrina.

The Long Island criminal defense attorneys at Prime & O'Brien, LLP know just how dangerous and chaotic New York can be after a storm passes. If you have been charged with a crime in the Long Island area, you must take swift legal action to protect your rights against the prosecution. Contact a Long Island criminal attorney at the firm today for a free case evaluation and discuss your charges.

Categories: Criminal Defense
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