10 Things You Should Know for a DUI Stop

Being convicted for driving under the influence ( DUI) can be very serious and result in possible jail time and fees. Knowing how to proceed if you are stopped for potential DUI can save you considerable time, money, and grief.

The 10 most important things to keep in mind include:

  • The most obvious is to never drink and drive. You will never need to concern yourself with a DUI if you don't consume alcohol before operating an automobile
  • You may only have seven days in order to respond to charges in order to protect your driving privileges
  • Being courteous to officers can go a long way
  • Be very careful what you say to an officer as it can be held against you in court
  • You have the right to refuse a field sobriety test
  • You can choose between a blood test or breath test or you may refuse either
  • You can retake a blood test but not a breath test
  • If you refuse to take a test you can be given a mandatory minimum of a one year revocation of your driving privileges
  • Breath tests are voluntary and cannot be used to prove guilt or innocence in court, but they can be admitted as evidence in order to support an arrest.
  • You have the right to speak to an attorney before discussing your case with officers

Get knowledgeable defense now!

If you have been arrested for DUI you do not need to abandon hope; call an experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as you can and they can get started on your defense. The legal team at Prime & O'Brien has over 20 years of legal experience and they are standing by to help. There is no criminal case too difficult for them to handle, so call their office today to speak with a Long Island criminal lawyer and schedule your free initial consultation.

Categories: Criminal Defense, DUI
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