Top 10 Ways to Avoid an Arrest

Being arrested is never pleasant. Beyond the inconvenience of the situation, it often leads to fines, jail time, and other unpleasant consequences. More importantly, your future and your reputation could be ruined from an arrest, even if you aren't ever convicted of any crime.

Here are some helpful tips on how to stay out of trouble with the law:

  1. Don't Drink and Drive
    New York has strict laws about drinking and driving. If you are going to be consuming alcohol, make sure you have a designated driver or will not be getting behind the wheel for the next few hours.
  2. Know Weapons Laws
    Few things lead to arrest as fast as an illegal weapon. Be sure you know your state's weapons laws so you can avoid possession of knives, guns, etc. that would land you in trouble. In addition, you should know these laws before selling or purchasing a weapon, and you should be careful to avoid bringing weapons into places where they are prohibited, such as schools.
  3. Avoid Illegal Drugs
    Be sure to keep away from illegal drugs. Getting caught with narcotics can constitute anything from a misdemeanor to a class A felony. The sale, manufacture, possession, and use of numerous drugs are prohibited under New York law. Be sure to properly handle prescription drugs, and ensure when driving that your passengers do not have illegal substances with them.
  4. Don't Steal
    Even the smallest case of shoplifting is considered a class A misdemeanor in New York, and could lead to up to a year of imprisonment. Because of improved security it has become more difficult to get away with theft. Make up your mind not to take something you cannot afford.
  5. Avoid Violent Behavior
    Many arrests occur on account of abusive behavior. To be charged with assault requires only that you make a threat you are capable of carrying out. Check your temper and avoid saying or doing anything threatening, even if you do not intend to cause harm to someone else. This can help you keep far from charges of assault, domestic violence, and battery, to name a few.
  6. Obey Traffic Laws
    Even something as simple as following the speed limit can help you stay as far as possible from an arrest. Many crimes could be avoided simply by obeying traffic laws. You can stay informed on the most recent traffic laws through the DMV.
  7. Stay On Top of Court Dates
    If you have been summoned to court—even if you are innocent of a charge—you must be sure to appear on the given date. If you fail to show, a warrant will be issued for your arrest. In the case that you have already missed a court date, you should contact or visit the courthouse and remedy the situation as soon as possible.
  8. Keep Good Company
    You can be arrested if you are in the company of someone who is caught committing a crime. For example, you are liable to face arrest if your companion is selling drugs. By making careful choices about those with whom you will spend your time, you can help minimize your chance of arrest.
  9. Follow Your Probation
    Be careful to follow the terms of your probation, such as remaining in your judicial district. A probation violation will lead to your arrest and imprisonment. When in doubt, cooperate with your officer and avoid unlawful activities.
  10. Don't Resist Arrest
    In the event that you are being arrested, do not fight the officer. This will only aggravate your situation. Any time you encounter law enforcement officials it is in your best interest to comply with their direction, as this could help minimize your charges in court.

    If you have been arrested, the Long Island criminal defense attorneys at Prime & O'Brien, LLP have nearly 20 years of experience and can help you seek a favorable outcome. Contact an attorney to discuss your case.
Categories: Criminal Defense
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